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Author Topic: Differences in schools  (Read 3180 times)
ringtailposs
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« Reply #15 on: July 23, 2011, 05:51:26 PM »

Hi Pen,

Your post is really interesting. I do have one question...what is "Reception" and how does it differ from starting in Year 1? ( which I guess is equivalent to our First Grade?)

Umm, okay, I have another question: what does "3terms" in Reception mean as opposed to "6 terms?" You mention that you son missed 3 terms so he did 6 terms...I'm confused ! ( not that it takes much to confuse me.)

Oh, and no, we don't have a hat or sunsafe policy in any state, at least to my knowledge. Seems like that would be a good thing to have, however, particularly for our states whose hot weather begins in May and lasts through October.
Hi Mikki, I'm not good at explaining things, am I? I get the impression that your Kindergarten is like the first year of school - as in, AT the school... is that right? Here, Kindy (as it is affectionately called) is a separate institution. Then, when they go to school, the first "grade" is Reception and they can start any time of year. When they hit Year 1, it starts in February, so the child will complete 3, 4, 5, or 6 terms of Reception before starting Year 1 (depending on what time of year they started Reception). My twins turned 5 in June, so missed the intake for term2 and started in term 3. Hence they did 18 months in Reception before moving into Year 1. Since they picked up reading amazingly easily (they are on level 28 which is as high as it goes, and are only expected to be on about Level 16 by the end of Year 1) and even the teacher admits they are bright, it seems they would have coped easily with only 3 terms of Reception and could be half way through Year 2 by now. But you don't know how well they will do before they start... I admit I'm disappointed that this year they were put into a class where half the students only did the 3 terms Reception and are still struggling to settle. Of course the school takes the attitude that all teachers are competent and I know that I can't get them moved without causing a huge stink. I don't want to get on the bad side of the principal, so we're riding it out, but I am definitely going to ask that they are put into a straight Year 2 class next year, not a combined 1/2. Does this clear things up for you?
And I'm surprised about the hat thing... I assumed you would have similar rules. Maybe it's a bigger issue here because the hole in the ozone is over Australia  Cheesy  Pen
PS. I'm not down on the Reception system... my son did well out of 5 terms of Reception... general consensus is that boys benefit from more time in Reception... they tend to take longer to settle into the whole school thing. In Year 1 they start to have more responsibilities.
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smoonee
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« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2011, 07:47:28 PM »

I just used a search engine. Bing or your search engine can pull up some good sources. I have a few friends and a family member from Australia, but I do not know of the specific differences. Happy writing to you. Sara
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_term
www.convictcreations.com/culture/yankaussie.htm
nces.ed.gov/pubsearch/pubsinfo.asp?pubid=2005021
www.peo.gov.au/students/cl/comparison.html
www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au
www.ed.gov
dest.gov.au
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ringtailposs
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« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2011, 02:02:55 PM »

Thanks for your help Sara. I was gonna keep it light-hearted as opposed to including curriculum detail, but am yet to start writing the article. I have these ideas and then lack the time/motivation to get on with it. I should also be writing my last assignment, but have spent more time on MWO this month. (sigh)

Beautiful baby photo. Kiss Thanks again.
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smoonee
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« Reply #18 on: August 02, 2011, 01:24:50 AM »

sure Smiley I'm happy that you found some of that info interesting. I keep tabs on interesting articles saved in my Favorites on my internet tool bar. Occasionally I'll open a new document and randomly write notes to myself including pasted websites and such. It's nice to have something that I can go back to in reference and add more info to. Another thing I have reminded myself of lately is interviewing. Have you thought of interviewing a teacher or educator at one of your local schools and one from the U.S.?

Thank you for the compliment. My baby is 6 weeks old now. Smiley She is my angel. Happy writing. 

                                                                 Sara
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ringtailposs
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« Reply #19 on: August 13, 2011, 04:18:53 AM »

Londy's PB&J article got me thinking...

No child is allowed to take a PB sandwich to school here because, as far as I know, there is a strict "no nuts" policy in every school, kindergarten and childcare center. This is because a percentage of children have nut allergies. It seems it's not the rule in the US if kids take PB&J sandwiches to school... is this true?

I've never had a PB&J sandwich and I feel like I've missed out on something big since everyone on this forum seems to love them   Cry

Cheers, Pen
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hardt
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« Reply #20 on: August 13, 2011, 08:51:06 AM »

I believe that Peanut Butter is more popular in the states than in Europe also.
I had a co-worker from Italy. At the hotel's buffet breakfast, he picked up what he thought was "butter" for his toast. Opening it and seeing a mini-tub of what looked like baby-poo, he was hesitant. He dipped his knife into it and tasted a small amount.
His eyes got huge.
"What is this?" he asked.
"Peanut butter."
"What from?"
"Uhm, peanuts..."
"What is 'peanut'?"
"Do you like it?"
"Yes! It is amazing!"
"You should try Jif. I'll get you some later."
He said nothing as he continued to lick PB from his knife, smiling between strokes.
I bought him a family size container of Jif Peanut Butter. By lunch the next day he had eaten the whole thing.
I sent him back to Italy with 2 more. He ate half of one on the plane. (imagine a plane full of people [some of whom had never tasted/smelled peanut butter] wondering just what they were cooking in the galley.)
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« Reply #21 on: August 13, 2011, 09:04:11 AM »

Londy's PB&J article got me thinking...

No child is allowed to take a PB sandwich to school here because, as far as I know, there is a strict "no nuts" policy in every school, kindergarten and childcare center. This is because a percentage of children have nut allergies. It seems it's not the rule in the US if kids take PB&J sandwiches to school... is this true?

I've never had a PB&J sandwich and I feel like I've missed out on something big since everyone on this forum seems to love them   Cry

Cheers, Pen
Actually, it causes a lot of problems here when a child does have allergies. Some places have the same "no nuts" policy you have there. I think it is common in some states to have the policy statewide. I have a cousin who is anaphylactic to peanuts. She started kindergarten last year, and the school instituted the no nuts policy. Unfortunately there were many people in the community who responded very poorly to it. Their complaint was that their children would not be able to have what they wanted for lunch. I found it very sad that people were more concerned about their children's preferences when those preferences might cost a child her life.
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ringtailposs
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« Reply #22 on: August 13, 2011, 05:11:55 PM »

It's been the policy here for so long that all my kids grew up with it... my eldest just turned 11. And lucky for me, my kids never took to PB, so it wasn't an issue... they all go to school with Vegemite in their sangers, but I have overheard other parents complaining that their child loves PB and wishes they could use it.

Little story:
One day I put a bit of left over cake in Henry's lunchbox for his recess. A little while later it suddenly occurred to me that it had nuts in... I raced to the school in a complete flap, feeling like a neglectful parent. The woman at reception also went into a flap when I told her and got out a list. She looked at it and said that there was an allergic kid in that class, so rang the classroom to get the offending item removed immediately. I went home relieved. When Henry came home, I apologized that his recess was taken from him. He said that the teacher asked the class if anyone was allergic, no one responded, so he got to eat it anyhow (in the classroom).

Thanks Ellen, for the info.  Smiley
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ringtailposs
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« Reply #23 on: August 13, 2011, 05:13:35 PM »


"You should try Jif. I'll get you some later."



Jif is a cleaning product in this country... I thought you were trying to kill the guy!!   Cheesy
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write_away
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« Reply #24 on: August 13, 2011, 10:05:42 PM »

Not to change the subject, but I giggled when I imaginged listening to you say " Vegemite in their sangers"

It reminded me of Steve Irwin (Crocodile Hunter) trying to teach is bride Terri Aussie slang. I smile everytime I think about that episode. If it weren't for the heat, I'd love to spend some time in Australia. Maybe if I visited in winter...
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carina
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« Reply #25 on: August 16, 2011, 04:55:24 AM »

Hi, it sounds as if the school system in Australia is more similar too the school system here in South Africa.(which is based on British Imperial)

1. You go to 1st grade in the year you turn 7.
2. The school year start in January- December vs. school in USA in September- May.
3. All schools have uniforms, and it differ from one school to the next. And there is a code for wearing your hair and nails, in my days it use to be like that, I don't know any more.
4.We don't have lunch(rooms) and kids/parents have to pack their own lunch. I think in most USA Schools lunch is optional, you don't have to buy from the cafeteria and you can still bring your own lunch. But every state is different.

It would be interesting in adding "home schooling" to this comparison.
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shannon21
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« Reply #26 on: September 30, 2011, 10:42:36 PM »

I'm not sure exactly what the public schools here in Pennsylvania do, but I know that in my district, students don't have clothing requirements, and I believe they have a cafeteria-style lunch time, but they can bring their own lunches. They begin mid-August and end in the beginning of June. They have report-card conference days off and snow-days off (I'm not sure about other breaks). Days are added (or break days are taken away) to make up for snow-days. I'm not quite sure on the other details about age and all.

In the private school I graduated from (K-12), we wore uniforms. We had a choice from a few similar styles and different colors of sweaters/patterns of skirts, etc.). We all brought our own lunches from home, then have a recess. We began in the end of August and end the year either at the end of May or the very beginning of June (depending on how the calendar falls). We went to school for half of the day during report-card days, and we worked at home during snow-days, so breaks were never taken away from and days were never added to the end of the year. We had Labor Day off, Columbus Day off (some years), A Thanksgiving break, a Christmas/New Years break, President's Day off, a Spring break, and Memorial Day off. To enter kindergarten, a child must be 5 by mid-October (I don't remember the exact date, sorry Sad )

What is Vegemite? It sounds yummy Smiley

-Shannon
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