October 24, 2014, 11:49:02 AM
bigger smaller reset 800px Wide width Full width Reset * *

Writers Retreat

 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Automatic registration is open again. If you have any questions, drop me a line -- author@janfields.com
Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
 91 
 on: September 25, 2014, 05:20:22 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
Children's Writers eNews
September 25, 2014
"The Write Words to Read"
The Institute of Children's Literature
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com
1-800-243-9645
Editor: Jan Fields -- author@janfields.com

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
"Those who dream by day are cognizant of many things that escape those who dream only at night."
Read more at
 -- Edgar Allan Poe
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
1. News
2. Online in Rx
3. At the Writer's Retreat
4. What's New at Kristi's?
5. Market
6. Cool Site
7. Essay
8. Good News
------------------------------------------------------
1. ICL has a new writing contest: for Kindergarten Stories
https://www.writersbookstore.com/sc/wbs_contest.htm
Chedk out this chat on historical and biographical picture books
------------------------------------------------------
2. In the Rx
"Picturing History in Picture Books" with Pegi Deitz Shea
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/tr01/shea.shtml
history isn't just for the big kids -- check out this great chat for more.
-------------------------
3. Are You On The Writer's Retreat?
http://www.institutechildrenslit.net/index.php
The September discussion on "Discouragement" is going on now.

And for all visitors whether registered or not, you'll find plenty of helpful information: get help for student lessons. Learn to build solid plots. Share your ups and downs with fellow writers. It's all there.
------------------------
4. What's New at Kristi's?
http://kristiholl.net/writers-blog/

Friday, Sept. 19: “Building Writing Muscle”
Building writing muscle is much like trying to build body muscle. Start small. Give yourself doable short goals where you can succeed.

Tuesday, Sept. 23: “Beware! Burnout Ahead!”
We work hard to achieve the writing dream, but we can be blind to the signs that we're headed for burnout where our dream can become a nightmare.

------------------------
5. Kaeden
http://www.kaeden.com/pages/authors_illustrators
Educational publisher accepting manuscripts. From their guidelines:
"At this time, we have a particular need for beginning chapter books, unique non-fiction manuscripts, and manuscripts with strong characters that have potential to become a series."
---------------------------
6. Author Website Series
http://www.darcypattison.com/marketing/author-website-toc/
Check out this amazing series on the what and why of author websites from Darcy Pattison.
---------------------------
7. Where Do I Get My Plot?
Check Your Character.

Many writers who struggle with plot tend to see plot and character as totally different things. You construct a plot and populate it with characters. The end. But in reality, your main character is your best possible source of plot and many times is a good starting place for story creation. So how might that work?

Suppose I begin with a character. Say I'm thinking I'll construct a story with an animal character because I love the characterization potential. I decide to go with an unusual animal. Say...a spider. What kinds of character traits might I brainstorm to go with my spider? She'd be patient, since spiders have to wait on their lunch to come to them. She'd be clever since spiders can make interesting things. She'd be quiet (anyone ever meet a noisy spider?) I imagine here being a bit of a homebody.

And I'd give her friends who are very different. She could have a friend who is fluttery and very aware of her own beauty -- a butterfly. In fact, I might like all her friends to be quite vain to contrast with my main character. So I'll give her a chickadee (with her lovely cap) and a chipmunk (who is quite proud of his cheek pouches.) I give her three friends, because I know readers love stories with elements in three. Also all of her friends are physically quick. In many ways, they're creatures you might imagine a homely spider would envy.

So quiet little spider is spinning and making something from silk. Her friends come by to visit and they're all curious about what she's making, but they all assume that what they have (lovely feather cap, beautiful wings, clever cheek pouches) will be better. Spider calmly responds to each question -- not being mean to her friends but also keeping the mystery of exactly what she is making. Her quiet nature and patience in sticking to the task of what she is making, even with all the distractions come into play.

Then at the end of the story, what spider has been quietly making is revealed, and all her friends agree that it's pretty amazing. This plot, which grew out of how I imagined the personality of my spider character, turned into a story, SPIDER'S RIDDLE, which eventually appeared in LADYBUG magazine. The entire story grew out of the main character.

I've heard editors mention how much they like a plot where both the story problem and the story solution grow out of character traits of the main character. So come up with some characters and list everything you can think of about them. Then see what plot pops up. You just might surprise yourself.

-----------------------
8. Good News

Trudee Law: I am pleased to announce that my short story, "Brave in Real Life", will be published in the October issue of Spaceports & Spidersilk magazine.

Rene Diane Aube: Just wanted to share with you (in case you didn't see my multitudes of posts on face book lol) that I received my FIRST Cheesy check from a magazine, THE KIDS ARK. They purchased a story I wrote called "Jesus Changes Everything".

Donna Simard : I have just released the first book to my children picture book series Shhh! It's a Surprise. Dad and Michael at the Zoo. After publishing my first book "Donna's dozen" I am extremely excited. Both books are available on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, McNally Robinson and many bookstores.

Mikki Sadil: I've just signed a contract for my third novel for children, age 9-12, LILY LETICIA LANGFORD AND THE BOOK OF PRACTICAL MAGIC. It will be released in the spring of 2015 by Muse It Up Publishing.

Raven Howell: My poem, Days of Fall, is in the September 2014 issue of Spider magazine. 

What's Your Good News? Send to author@janfields.com -- be sure to put "good news" in the subject line since I get a lot of book announcements due to the review work I do. So I don't want your good news to slip through the cracks.
------------

9. For All Subscribers

Many of our enews issues are being blocked from getting to all of our subscribers. It can be difficult to convince your email provider that you truly want to receive this enews. Therefore we've created a list of directions to make it easier for you find the exact steps to ensure the enews always makes it to your inbox.

Please, check out this link http://institutechildrenslit.com/email_whitelist_instructions.htm for specific directions to ensure you get every issue of the Children's Writers eNews.

-------------
To Unsubscribe from the email version of Children's Writers eNews, go to
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/email_updates_unsubscribe.shtml
-------------
NOTE: I can add you, remove you, or change your address manually and will be happy to do so.
To have your address changed, email author@janfields.com and do the following:
1. TELL ME that it's a change of address for the enews. I handle a lot of things so if you don't tell me what you want me to do, I may not do it.
2. TELL ME your OLD address as well as the NEW one. I cannot search by your name. I need the old address.
3. DO NOT send me a mass mailing that you sent to everyone in your address book that just tells me your new email. I won't know what you want me to do or if it's really for me at all. And I'll probably just delete it.

 92 
 on: September 25, 2014, 05:19:15 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
It's great to have a positive outlook, Delicia!

 93 
 on: September 24, 2014, 08:32:03 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by Delicia
Writing never cease. Just as life goes on. Just as we're reading other successful writers' work, the next generation will be reading our succcess! So accept rejection and keep writing.

 94 
 on: September 24, 2014, 08:15:10 PM 
Started by ColoradoKate - Last post by Delicia
Those who wish to write..always produce a best-selling story. Delicia

 95 
 on: September 24, 2014, 07:36:46 PM 
Started by KatieC - Last post by Delicia
Burning out becomes part of our everyday lives, especially if your'e doing more tasks for others, putting yourself on the back-burner. That was my issue. When it's your time to do your life..your'e almost burned-out! "Keep pushing towards your writing dream, no matter how rejected and make it happen!" is what i say.Huh??

 96 
 on: September 24, 2014, 07:24:29 PM 
Started by RMHSmith - Last post by Delicia
Patience really has its rewards....

 97 
 on: September 24, 2014, 07:09:51 PM 
Started by RMHSmith - Last post by ColoradoKate
I'm glad about the happy resolution!  Grin

 98 
 on: September 24, 2014, 04:59:58 PM 
Started by RMHSmith - Last post by RMHSmith
Well, I've learned a hard lesson not to get discouraged too quickly without giving my editor a chance to reply. She replied quickly and confirmed that my piece has actually been published, but it will be in the digital edition of the magazine, not the print edition. Whew!

I didn't realize there were two different editions. (I thought the digital edition was the same as what is in the print edition. Instead, it may be similar, but the digital edition includes a bonus section, and that's what my piece will be in.)

I'm sure my e-mail to the editor screamed "Amateur!" but she knows I'm a first time published children's author, and I'm sure she sees it all the time.  Smiley

She actually apologized, though, for not clarifying that before. It does say so in the Contributor's Agreement, but it was in such fine print that it didn't register with me.

Jan and others, are there any ICL materials about how to dissect contracts and agreements? I think I need a review! My brother is an attorney and can help me understand them, but I feel silly having to get his help on such a brief document.

~Rachel


 99 
 on: September 24, 2014, 04:54:42 PM 
Started by RMHSmith - Last post by ColoradoKate
No insights, but how odd! And I'm sorry. I hope the editor responds soon.  Undecided

 100 
 on: September 24, 2014, 03:53:51 PM 
Started by KatieC - Last post by RMHSmith
Great topic, Katie--I can absolutely understand that some experience burn out. There are times I wish I could feel burn out and turn my back on writing, though. But I can't escape it because it's my one true passion--if I say I've had enough of it, before I even realize it, I'm back at my desk typing away.

There is a lot of pain and heartbreak in this field--I experienced some today, when I received in the mail an issue of a magazine in which my piece was supposed to be presented (I got the acceptance and signed the contributor's agreement and all), and the piece ended up not being in it (and the editor didn't communicate with me why). It felt like a slap in the face, as if they were saying sorry your piece wasn't published, but here are two copies, so you can covet others' accomplishment while you study our magazine a bit further! (That last bit is what I get tired of reading from publishers, since I've studied about every known children's magazine and spent countless dollars ordering issues to do that.)

Days like this, it's easy to think about other jobs that could support me and my family better. But then I remember that, 1) First and foremost, I don't write for the money, but because I just love writing (though becoming a best-seller is my ultimate dream), and 2) Every other field I've tried to enter has been disappointing and made me miserable. So, I may as well spend my time doing what I love, even if I die a rejected, poor, starving writer.   Smiley

Like everyone, though, I need a break here and there. But I think most every job is that way. Everyone needs some down time to renew their mind and spirit.

~Rachel

Pages: 1 ... 8 9 [10]
Powered by SMF 1.1.7 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC
Leviathan design by Bloc | XHTML | CSS