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 21 
 on: May 22, 2015, 02:30:11 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by Beth Consugar
Thanks for the heads-up about the Blue Mountain Arts contest. I started working on something for it!

 22 
 on: May 22, 2015, 07:30:05 AM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by judyr
Maybe you could break a few rules, just don't break them all.  Wink

 23 
 on: May 21, 2015, 02:20:26 PM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by jojocookie
Hmmmm. Thank you everyone. Okay.

Guess, I shouldn't a be a breaking no rules. Not today, any how.

Seeings how I'm just itty bitty baby writer and all.

 24 
 on: May 21, 2015, 12:06:40 PM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by ColoradoKate
And (heh heh) I think that if something stands out, in a negative way, to your critique partners or beta readers, then you might want to rethink doing it, or doing it as often. If they point it out simply because it breaks a grammar "rule," that's one thing (and you can choose to ignore them), but if they point it out because it has distracted them or become annoying, that's quite another.

 25 
 on: May 21, 2015, 08:45:15 AM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by hardt
Writing is like Justifiable Homicide.

You can get away with anything, as long as you prove that it was the right thing to do.

If you break the rules and fail, you get punished.

 26 
 on: May 21, 2015, 04:48:57 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
Children's Writers eNews
May 21, 2015
"The Write Words to Read"
The Institute of Children's Literature
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com
1-800-243-9645
Editor: Jan Fields -- author@janfields.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------
I want to write but more than that I want to bring out all kinds of things that lie buried deep in my heart.
-- Anne Frank
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
1. News
2. Online in Rx
3. At the Writer's Retreat
4. What's New at Kristi's?
5. Market
6. Cool Site
7. Essay
8. Good News
9. Note to subscribers
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Nothing "big newsy" again today -- so I'll just wish you another happy weekend ahead.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. In the Rx
Let's Talk "Close" vs. "Distant"
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/ws05/closedistant.shtml
A different way to look at show/tell and how to bring your reader into the story more fully.
-------------------------
3. Are You On The Writer's Retreat?
http://www.institutechildrenslit.net/index.php
May's discussion of the month is "What is Voice? What is Style?" -- all through the month, we'll be talking about voice and style. What makes it important and what makes it yours.
------------------------
4. What's New at Kristi's?
http://kristiholl.net/writers-blog/

Friday, May 15: "Writing after Major Losses"
Writing burn-out is a by-product of prolonged stress. Each symptom stifles creativity in a specific way--but each has a remedy.

Tuesday, May 19: "Writing During Summer Travels"
During the summer, can writing deadlines be combined with traveling to see family and taking vacations? Yes. Here's how.
---------------------------
5. Blue Mountain Arts Poetry Contest
http://www.sps.com/poetry/index.html
Accepts rhyming or nonrhyming (but says non-rhyming tends to read better). Looking for emotionally moving poetry for a special person or occasion. No Fee. Cash Prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. Deadline June 30, 2015. Enter via online form or mail in.
---------------------------
6.Resources For Children's Writers
http://www.ResourcesForChildrensWriters.com
Named for the 5th year in a row in Writers' Digest Magazine's annual list "Best Websites For Writers," this is a one stop for everything you need to know about writing, finding agents and publishers, writing query letters, marketing your work, and so much more. Hundreds of links to articles and sites within over 30 distinct categories.
---------------------------
7. Explaining the Advance

The advance -- money an author receives at some point after signing a book contract but before collecting royalties -- can be a confusing thing for many writers. What exactly is an advance? Are they bad for publishing? Do you even want one? Do you have to pay them back if your book doesn't do as well as expected? All of these questions have led to some odd myths about advances.

So, what is an advance? An advance isn't a loan. In simple terms, it's the money the publisher EXPECTS to pay to you in royalties, but paid upfront instead. Many times the publisher under-estimates the number of sales your book will make. In those cases, those extra sales generate royalties and you get a check periodically for your percentage of each sale after the advance "earns out." Most of the time, it takes close to a year or more for an advance to "earn out" and royalties to come in.

Many authors worry that a book is a failure if they never collect royalties in addition to the advance. A book actually begins to turn a profit for the publisher well ahead of the advance "earning out." Publishers aren't expecting a book to just break even. They always expect a book to turn them a profit (otherwise, they'd be really crappy at their business), so by the time an advance "earns out" -- the book has been turning a profit for a while. This is also mean that if your advance doesn't "earn out," your book WAS NOT a flop. It's pretty rare for an under achieving book to be a real flop at a professional commercial publisher.

At larger, well-established book publishers, advances are usually over $1000 -- and sometimes much over. At small publishers, an advance may be less or may not exist at all. Smaller publishers tend to see fewer sales. They just do. It comes from the power of the publicity/sales machine that lies within most big publishers (and this machine is working to generate sales even when the author doesn't see it in action). Because this machine is invisible to the author, it results in authors talking about how even the big publishers don't "promote." Big publishers have people in place to push their entire line of books and this sales pressure results in a surprising number of sales due to these "invisible" efforts.

Back to advances: if your advance doesn't "earn out," do you owe the money back to the publisher? No, almost always not. But this is one reason to read your contract carefully. Publishing contracts are written by publishers to benefit publishers. Traditionally advances, once paid, are free and clear. No paying back for any reason short of some very narrow breach conditions (mostly happening when something the AUTHOR does makes the book unpublishable). But it's always good to read the contract and make sure that advance money is completely clear of any restrictions rising from situations outside your hands. Things the publisher chooses to do should not result in YOU writing checks to pay THEM back.

The monster advances paid to some big-name or celebrity authors can be a burden on the industry because they are hard to "earn out." And they require a huge "up front" financial burden paid out long before the book is even capable of bringing in money. But the relatively small amounts offered to us "ordinary" writers is not a problem. Advances are good.

So, if advances are good -- why doesn't everyone offer them? For one, they are an up-front financial burden for the publisher. Some small publishers simply cannot take that extra financial risk so they either pay nominal advances or none at all. Also, for very small publishers, their expectations of sales are so low that it's really better (for them) if they don't necessarily let an author know that. For a tiny publisher who has books that have published books that sold less than 200 copies, knowing the possible total expect royalty would prevent most of the better books from being offered to them.

-----------------------
8. Good News

Donna Marie West: My month of May is doing well so far. I have an article entitled “Harry Houdini: Magician and More” up on the HALLOWEENFOREVERMORE website. I also have a new travel blog, “The 5 Best Beaches in the World” on the ECBC WEBSITE.

Cindy Overcast: My non-fiction article, “Cool Ways to Save” was published in the May, 2015 “Dollars & Cents” issue of FunForKidz Magazine.

Lauri Meyers: My middle grade short story "The Black Box" was published in the April issue of Stinkwaves Magazine. This was my first time seeing my name in print!

Cathy Keener: On April 28 I had a children's book released from Tate Publishing Co. In Mustang, Oklahoma. It is called "Jazzy Bunny gets Floppy-ear-itis." I am very excited and am currently working hard to market it. "Jazzy" has been my dream for a long time and your course that I took many years ago certainly helped the dream happen.


What's Your Good News? Send to author@janfields.com -- be sure to put "good news" in the subject line since I get a lot of book announcements due to the review work I do. So I don't want your good news to slip through the cracks.
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9. For All Subscribers

Many of our eNews issues are being blocked from getting to all of our subscribers. It can be difficult to convince your email provider that you truly want to receive this eNews. Therefore we've created a list of directions to make it easier for you find the exact steps to ensure the eNews always makes it to your inbox.

Please, check out this link http://institutechildrenslit.com/email_whitelist_instructions.htm for specific directions to ensure you get every issue of the Children's Writers eNews.

-------------
To Unsubscribe from the email version of Children's Writers eNews, go to
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/email_updates_unsubscribe.shtml
-------------
NOTE: I can add you, remove you, or change your address manually and will be happy to do so.
To have your address changed, email author@janfields.com and do the following:
1. TELL ME that it's a change of address for the eNews. I handle a lot of things so if you don't tell me what you want me to do, I may not do it.
2. TELL ME your OLD address as well as the NEW one. I cannot search by your name. I need the old address.
3. DO NOT send me a mass mailing that you sent to everyone in your address book that just tells me your new email. I won't know what you want me to do or if it's really for me at all. And I'll probably just delete it.

 27 
 on: May 20, 2015, 11:52:27 PM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by salex
Grammatically it is incorrect, but as far as I am concerned- and a host of my favorite authors, too-rules are meant to be broken. Most authors use it sparingly, but I vote for style. Smiley

 28 
 on: May 20, 2015, 04:30:51 PM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by jojocookie
I know of quite a few best selling authors who begin sentences with these words. I'm told one should never do that. Isn't it a matter of personal style.

 29 
 on: May 14, 2015, 08:10:09 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by Londy Leigh
KidLit411?!

Oh my gosh. Shocked

Thanks for sharing all of this!!

 30 
 on: May 14, 2015, 05:34:49 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
Children's Writers eNews
May 14, 2015
"The Write Words to Read"
The Institute of Children's Literature
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com
1-800-243-9645
Editor: Jan Fields -- author@janfields.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------
"I see myself in everything I write. All the good guys are me."
-- Stan Lee
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
1. News
2. Online in Rx
3. At the Writer's Retreat
4. What's New at Kristi's?
5. Market
6. Cool Site
7. Essay
8. Good News
9. Note to subscribers
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. Nothing newsy today -- so I'll just wish you a happy weekend ahead.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. In the Rx
How-To Articles
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/tr01/ckohler2012.shtml
How-to articles are always a good seller and I often do them when I need a little boost from a quick sale. So they're well worth learning to do and do well.
-------------------------
3. Are You On The Writer's Retreat?
http://www.institutechildrenslit.net/index.php
May's discussion of the month is "What is Voice? What is Style?" -- all through the month, we'll be talking about voice and style. What makes it important and what makes it yours.
------------------------
4. What's New at Kristi's?
http://kristiholl.net/writers-blog/

Friday, May 8: "Writing Through the Storms"
Like everyone else, writers have lives that can be stressful. Are there tricks to writing through the storms? Yes!

Tuesday, May 12: "Writing Through Relationship Struggles"
Many writers lose confidence and lay aside their writing dreams because of marital problems. THIS ISN'T NECESSARY. Here's how.
---------------------------
5. Spigot Science for Kids and Classrooms
http://spigotsciencemag.com/become-a-spigot-writer/
Spigot Science Magazine has just posted new themes: Landforms, Inventions and The Brain.
---------------------------
6. KidLit 411 for Writers
http://www.kidlit411.com/2014/01/kidlit411-for-writers.html
"All your favorite sources in one place." This page is just stuffed with links to excellent writing resources -- you'll benefit from reading all of them.
---------------------------
7. More Mysteries

Make the Mystery Matter! With stories for younger children, an actual dead body is rarely involved (though YA easily might include a dead body), but the mystery should be important to the characters. What’s making Mama’s roses wilt might be a mystery important to Mama, but it would be hard to convince a reader that it’s really a compelling mystery (though you could probably do a good magazine mystery for very young readers with it).  What makes a compelling mystery?
* Someone has disappeared.
* Some vital thing is missing.
* The main character has been accused of something awful.
* A scary person is doing a suspicious thing.
* A well-liked person is acting oddly and doing questionable things.
* An animal (or many) is/are in peril.

Once you've decided upon the problem in the mystery, you need to give the sleuth (and the reader) some clues. There are basically two kinds of clues: real ones and red herrings. The real clues actually point to the actual solution. The red herrings take us off in a different direction. To be fair, you  have to give the reader all the clues that you give the sleuth -- so the reader has as much chance of solving the mystery as the sleuth. BUT you don't want the reader to solve the mystery way ahead of the sleuth.

Once way to keep that from happening is a little distraction. Whenever the sleuth comes upon a genunine clue something big happens to draw our attention away. Just as the sleuth walks by the vase of rare blooms (a clue), someone calls him over to look at a suspicious red stain on the carpet (which turns out to be nothing, but is far more attention getting than a bunch of flowers). These distractions can be red herrings (making us suspicious of someone not actually guilty) or they might just draw our attention aside.

Another way to avoid making the real clues too obvious is to have the main character investigate a room/area and notes all the items in the area, but only one itsem is a genuine clue or have the main character do a computer search to learn about a suspect and a clue is hidden in the wealth of details about the person’s past. Or a character makes an off-hand comment that becomes important when combined with other clues later. There are many ways to bury the "real" clues so that a mystery isn't too easy. Clues (both real and red herrings) are often based on something “not quite right” – a character doing something unlikely or finding an object in a place you wouldn’t expect.

The Red Herring clues should be so good that they really make the wrong suspect look guilty or the wrong solution look feasible – this both speeds up plot AND gives a good reason why the sleuth isn't noting the more genuine clues as they appear. But be careful with the writing "slight of hand" because you want the reader to be surprised, but the reader should feel that “of course” that’s the solution.

-----------------------
8. Good News

Christine Collier: My article, “Writers Need Surprises!” will be published in the Success Story column at Writers Weekly, an online writing ezine. It details how the Fun For Kidz magazine group have republished one article three times, and one poem twice, besides other sales, totaling nine now. My essay, “A Daughter’s Perspective,” will be in the July issue of Prairie Times family newspaper.

Lisa Hart: My article "More Than Rocks and Stone" now appears online with Schoolwide Publishing. Working with this market has been an amazing experience and the finished project look incredible!

Melissa Abramovitz: I'm thrilled that my picture book/early chapter book Helping Herbie Hedgehog (Guardian Angel Publishing, February 2015) won a Pinnacle Book Achievement Award. www.melissaabramovitz.com

What's Your Good News? Send to author@janfields.com -- be sure to put "good news" in the subject line since I get a lot of book announcements due to the review work I do. So I don't want your good news to slip through the cracks.
------------

9. For All Subscribers

Many of our eNews issues are being blocked from getting to all of our subscribers. It can be difficult to convince your email provider that you truly want to receive this eNews. Therefore we've created a list of directions to make it easier for you find the exact steps to ensure the eNews always makes it to your inbox.

Please, check out this link http://institutechildrenslit.com/email_whitelist_instructions.htm for specific directions to ensure you get every issue of the Children's Writers eNews.

-------------
To Unsubscribe from the email version of Children's Writers eNews, go to
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/email_updates_unsubscribe.shtml
-------------
NOTE: I can add you, remove you, or change your address manually and will be happy to do so.
To have your address changed, email author@janfields.com and do the following:
1. TELL ME that it's a change of address for the eNews. I handle a lot of things so if you don't tell me what you want me to do, I may not do it.
2. TELL ME your OLD address as well as the NEW one. I cannot search by your name. I need the old address.
3. DO NOT send me a mass mailing that you sent to everyone in your address book that just tells me your new email. I won't know what you want me to do or if it's really for me at all. And I'll probably just delete it.

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