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 11 
 on: August 27, 2015, 10:26:07 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by vtashman
I'm a new children's book writer and new to Writer's Retreat! I'm happy to hear about ICL and will definitely check it out!

 12 
 on: August 27, 2015, 01:13:14 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
Children's Writers eNews
August 27, 2015
"The Write Words to Read"
The Institute of Children's Literature
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com
Editor: Jan Fields -- author@janfields.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------
“Some day I shall succeed, I really believe, but it is a weary game.”
-H.G. Wells
written in 1888 when he had only sold one story despite many tries, some submitted, some burnt.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
1. News
2. Online in Rx
3. At the Writer's Retreat
4. Market
5. Cool Site
6. A Message from the Institute
7. Good News
8. Note to subscribers
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. News: Check Out the Message from the Institute below!
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. In the Rx
Creative Nonfiction vs Informational Fiction
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/wt06/creativenonfiction.shtml
It's easy to be confused about how much fiction is allowed in nonfiction -- even publishers vary on how they look at it. But here are some helps understand what to call your work when it marries the real and the made up.

-------------------------
3. Are You On The Writer's Retreat?
http://www.institutechildrenslit.net/index.php
August's discussion of the month is "Writing for Contests" -- all through the month, we'll be talking about how to create entries that stand out from the crowd in a writing contest, Pop in to talk about it all during August.
------------------------
4. Outdoor Families Online
http://www.outdoorfamiliesonline.com/writers-guidelines/
Accepts QUERIES only on ideas connected with outdoor adventures or activities with families. Includes how-to, recipes, first-person experiences.
Not presently a paying market, but may be a great place to break in if you have a great "family story" about something interesting or unexpected that happened to your outdoorsy family.
--------------------------
5. 9 Ways to Test Your Core Concept
http://www.adventuresinyapublishing.com/2015/02/story-idea-worksheet-nail-and-sell-your.html
Worksheet and tips to nail your story concept.
---------------------------
6. For awhile now there has been some buzz about things winding down here at ICL. Well, I have great news! Things are not winding down. In fact they are winding up! I’d like to introduce Katie Davis, and she has a message for you:
---

My name is Katie Davis and I’m one of the one’s doing the winding! Here’s a link to my official bio <http://www.katiedavis.com/about>  to give you an idea of my connection to writing, to teaching, and my experience in publishing. 

The good news is, the beloved Institute of Children’s Literature is not going anywhere! My husband Jerry and I are taking it into the future. What does this mean?

* It means the courses will still have the same great content they’ve always had.

* It means the valuable guidance you’ve always received from the ICL instructors will continue with the same high standards.

* It also means we are updating all of our materials and slowly modernizing our web site and will have lots of exciting news and features for you!

That last part will take a bit of time and effort on our parts, so we ask you to have some patience.

Thank you!

Warmly,

Katie Davis
---------------

More about Katie:

Katie Davis's books, published by Harcourt, S&S, HarperCollins, and Diversion Books, have sold over 755,000 copies, which is why she’s published How to Promote Your Children's Book, a marketing guide for
writers that debuted at #1 on Amazon.

Katie's secret superpower is her ability to teach non-techy and tech-fearful writers how to become better business people by building their platforms through social media, video, and creating/building mailing lists. Also known in her niche as one of the first writer entrepreneurs, Katie has created many events and courses for writers, including How to Create Your Author Platform (and Market Your Books without Being Pushy), Video Idiot Boot Camp, and Picture Book Summit (the largest and first online conference of its kind). Her podcast, Brain Burps About Books, is consistently ranked in the top 10 book-related categories. She's appeared regularly on WTNH and The Huffington Post. She is the director of both the Institute of Children’s Literature and Long Ridge Writers Group, which provide accredited courses for children’s and adult writers.

Katie has been honored to speak everywhere from a maximum security prison, to elementary schools, to university level, including UCONN and Yale, and has keynoted conferences and fundraising galas.
--
BooksByKatieDavis.com <http://BooksByKatieDavis.com>
-----------------------
7. Good News

Régine Frank: “It’s a Beautiful Drey in Your Neighborhood,” my article and related photos about squirrels’ nests, appears in the Sept/Oct 2015 issue of Fun For Kidz magazine, under the theme Nifty Rodents.

Laura Thomas: I’m ecstatic to announce my middle grade novel The Candle Maker has been published by Dancing With Bear Publishing! This little tale began as a short story assignment with ICL several years ago… always hang on to those ideas!

Shirley Raye Redmond: My article "LITTLE LOST PUFFIN" appears in the August 2015 issue of NATURE FRIEND.

Pamela Haskin: My picture book Max, The Boy Raindrop has been selected as the Children’s Picture Book Discovery Prize Winner for the 2014 Writers’ League of Texas Book Awards, recognizing outstanding books published in 2014 written by Texas authors.

Christa C. Hogan: I've just sold two stories to Keys for Kids. "Chickens & Video Games" and "Change" will appear in the Jan/Feb/March 2016 issue.

Rick Starkey: My middle grade novel, "Blues Bones" was acquired by Leap Books Seek. Publication is planned for spring 2016!

What's Your Good News? Send to author@janfields.com -- be sure to put "good news" in the subject line since I get a lot of book announcements due to the review work I do. So I don't want your good news to slip through the cracks.
------------

8. For All Subscribers

Many of our eNews issues are being blocked from getting to all of our subscribers. It can be difficult to convince your email provider that you truly want to receive this eNews. Therefore we've created a list of directions to make it easier for you find the exact steps to ensure the eNews always makes it to your inbox.

Please, check out this link http://institutechildrenslit.com/email_whitelist_instructions.htm for specific directions to ensure you get every issue of the Children's Writers eNews.

-------------
To Unsubscribe from the email version of Children's Writers eNews, go to
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/email_updates_unsubscribe.shtml
-------------
NOTE: I can add you, remove you, or change your address manually and will be happy to do so.
To have your address changed, email author@janfields.com and do the following:
1. TELL ME that it's a change of address for the eNews. I handle a lot of things so if you don't tell me what you want me to do, I may not do it.
2. TELL ME your OLD address as well as the NEW one. I cannot search by your name. I need the old address.
3. DO NOT send me a mass mailing that you sent to everyone in your address book that just tells me your new email. I won't know what you want me to do or if it's really for me at all. And I'll probably just delete it.

 13 
 on: August 26, 2015, 06:42:13 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by salex
Great news! Love Katie. I've been following her for a couple of years, taken classes, and learned so much. Happy Dance!

 14 
 on: August 26, 2015, 05:58:09 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by Cat
Oh, that is so exciting. Hurray! The courses were the best, and I'm so glad ICL is going to be here for many more years.

 15 
 on: August 26, 2015, 03:32:44 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by DonnaMW
Wow, great news! Your courses are fantastic and you all here have been so encouraging, I probably wouldn't even have a writing career if it hadn't been for learning about ICL and taking your courses.  Grin

 16 
 on: August 25, 2015, 04:08:11 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by ColoradoKate
Yay! Thanks, Jan. Hi, Katie.

 17 
 on: August 25, 2015, 03:49:55 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by Beth Consugar
Wow! Thanks for the update! I know you had told us a while back that you had heard some good things were coming to ICL, and I'm glad to hear that Katie Davis is one of the good happenings around here!


 18 
 on: August 25, 2015, 01:49:09 PM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
For awhile now there has been some buzz about things winding down here at ICL. Well, I have great news! Things are not winding down. In fact they are winding up! I’d like to introduce Katie Davis, and she has a message for you:

---

My name is Katie Davis and I’m one of the one’s doing the winding! Here’s a link to my official bio <http://www.katiedavis.com/about>  to give you an idea of my connection to writing, to teaching, and my experience in publishing.

The good news is, the beloved Institute of Children’s Literature is not going anywhere! My husband Jerry and I are taking it into the future. What does this mean?

*      It means the courses will still have the same great content they’ve always had.
*      It means the valuable guidance you’ve always received from the ICL instructors will continue with the same high standards.
*      It also means we are updating all of our materials and slowly modernizing our web site and will have lots of exciting news and features for you!

That last part will take a bit of time and effort on our parts, so we ask you to have some patience.

Thank you!
Warmly,

Katie Davis
 

Katie Davis's books, published by Harcourt, S&S, HarperCollins, and Diversion Books, have sold over 755,000 copies, which is why she’s published How to Promote Your Children's Book, a marketing guide for writers that debuted at #1 on Amazon.

Katie's secret superpower is her ability to teach non-techy and tech-fearful writers how to become better business people by building their platforms through social media, video, and creating/building mailing lists. Also known in her niche as one of the first writer entrepreneurs, Katie has created many events and courses for writers, including How to Create Your Author Platform (and Market Your Books without Being Pushy), Video Idiot Boot Camp, and Picture Book Summit (the largest and first online conference of its kind). Her podcast, Brain Burps About Books, is consistently ranked in the top 10 book-related categories. She's appeared regularly on WTNH and The Huffington Post. She is the director of both the Institute of Children’s Literature and Long Ridge Writers Group, which provide accredited courses for children’s and adult writers.

Katie has been honored to speak everywhere from a maximum security prison, to elementary schools, to university level, including UCONN and Yale, and has keynoted conferences and fundraising galas.

--

BooksByKatieDavis.com <http://BooksByKatieDavis.com>

 19 
 on: August 25, 2015, 03:33:07 AM 
Started by jojocookie - Last post by judyr
This site has some good contests: http://www.brenda-drake.com/

 20 
 on: August 19, 2015, 03:06:05 AM 
Started by jfields - Last post by jfields
Children's Writers eNews
August 20, 2015
"The Write Words to Read"
The Institute of Children's Literature
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com
Editor: Jan Fields -- author@janfields.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------
" I think [a good book] all starts with passion—a subject the author is passionate about exploring, whether it's fiction or nonfiction."
-- James Cross Giblin
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
CONTENTS OF THIS ISSUE
1. News
2. Online in Rx
3. At the Writer's Retreat
4. Market
5. Cool Site
6. Essay
7. Good News
8. Note to subscribers
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. News: Past Issues of the eNews are archived at
http://institutechildrenslit.net/index.php?board=45.0
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
2. In the Rx
"We're All in This Together"
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/ws05/together.shtml
Perspective on the roles of editors and writers in producing great material for readers.
-------------------------
3. Are You On The Writer's Retreat?
http://www.institutechildrenslit.net/index.php
August's discussion of the month is "Writing for Contests" -- all through the month, we'll be talking about how to create entries that stand out from the crowd in a writing contest, Pop in to talk about it all during August.
------------------------
4. GROUP
http://www.group.com/customer-support/submissions
Purchases materials for use in children's ministry including plays, skits, games, activities, Bible stories, etc -- guidelines for both magazine publication and book proposals.
--------------------------
5. Thoughts on Theme
http://www.adventuresinyapublishing.com/2015/06/thoughts-on-theme-by-claire-m-caterer.html
I know many newer writers struggle with theme and how it differs from plot. This essay gives some terrific insights on that.
---------------------------
6. From Mundane to Masterpiece

___Consider the sensory detail in your work. Studies have shown that the sense of smell is one our most emotionally evocative senses. As a writer, are you just a sightseer or do your stories smell as well? Also, do all the details serve a purpose in the spot you placed them? Random details don't spruce up your writing -- only the ones that feel organic in the narrative.

___Consider your motivations. Don’t overlook the motives of minor characters. You may not ever reveal why your villain acts so villainous, but you should know. The better you have thought out the motivations of each character, the more naturally well rounded they will become.

___Read in your target market or genre. I have seen folks try to write in a disparate area from the one where they choose to read. Some people even talk about this as if it were a virtue – not wanting to taint their voice by reading other writers. But reading what is being published in the genre you desire to write is one of the best educations you can get. You will internalize much of the feeling and pacing and construction of the books across the group as you read and your work will seem to effortlessly fit where you desire to publish. Without this research reading, you will often end up being one of the folks asking questions like “About how long should the chapters in this kind of book be?” or “How many characters should I introduce in chapter one?”

___Listen to your characters talk. Knowing your characters intimately is another key to creating dialogue specific to each person. As you understand the person’s background, motivations and habits, you will be able to craft dialogue that accomplishes your plot goals while sounding true to each person. Dialogue that comes from well thought out individuals can be written with far fewer speech tags because each person sounds so different to the reader’s inner ear.

___Toss the thesaurus. Not really, but understand that very few words are perfect synonyms. Words may appear to be interchangeable but each carries subtle shades of meaning and carries particular use baggage. For example: “The sun beat down on her neck as she cocked her head to avoid the glare from the window. She aimed the camera at the happy couple and shot.” Different word choice creates a totally different mood. “The sun warmed her neck as she turned her head to avoid the glare from the window. She turned the camera toward the couple, and snapped the picture.” Thesaurus thinking says both are the same, but writers need to choose each word for all its meaning and baggage.

___Create constraints. Limitations create tension and help a writer controls the environment he is creating. Without limitations, motivation can be hard to present realistically. Limitations may come in the form of time (the ticking clock), social (someone makes a rule) or physical (can't escape). Once you have created a limitation, you must remain true to it. If your character must accomplish his task within the hour, you cannot create a story that clearly packs in several hours worth of activity. No matter how much you tell the reader that he got it all done in an hour, they won’t believe you. Writing is often about freedom within form, but the limitations of form must not be ignored once they are introduced.

___Do not grow weary in well doing. Many writers know what the goal of a story/book is. They know how they intend to begin and where they want to end. They know what they want the character to learn. But somewhere along the line, they just lose momentum and fall back on characters who just happen to realize something…or characters who suddenly start sounding like their own parents as they lecture one another. If you have created a character who does rotten things, and you want to reach an end where he turns over a new leaf – you have to take him there logically and realistically. Don’t make your goal too lofty or you will almost certainly lag before you reach it.

-----------------------
7. Good News

Robin Lindzer: My novel, "One Wish" is available on Amazon.com.  You can read it on a Kindle, along with your PC or phone, with the Kindle application.

Ann Ingalls: The second in a series of Biggety Bat emergent readers was released in July. The new title is BIGGETY BAT: CHOW DOWN, BIGGETY!

What's Your Good News? Send to author@janfields.com -- be sure to put "good news" in the subject line since I get a lot of book announcements due to the review work I do. So I don't want your good news to slip through the cracks.
------------

8. For All Subscribers

Many of our eNews issues are being blocked from getting to all of our subscribers. It can be difficult to convince your email provider that you truly want to receive this eNews. Therefore we've created a list of directions to make it easier for you find the exact steps to ensure the eNews always makes it to your inbox.

Please, check out this link http://institutechildrenslit.com/email_whitelist_instructions.htm for specific directions to ensure you get every issue of the Children's Writers eNews.

-------------
To Unsubscribe from the email version of Children's Writers eNews, go to
http://www.institutechildrenslit.com/rx/email_updates_unsubscribe.shtml
-------------
NOTE: I can add you, remove you, or change your address manually and will be happy to do so.
To have your address changed, email author@janfields.com and do the following:
1. TELL ME that it's a change of address for the eNews. I handle a lot of things so if you don't tell me what you want me to do, I may not do it.
2. TELL ME your OLD address as well as the NEW one. I cannot search by your name. I need the old address.
3. DO NOT send me a mass mailing that you sent to everyone in your address book that just tells me your new email. I won't know what you want me to do or if it's really for me at all. And I'll probably just delete it.

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